pluckyou:

“Debbie Harry photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair, February 2014… we always thought Deb should play Boudica anyway… ”

Swooooon.

pluckyou:

Debbie Harry photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair, February 2014… we always thought Deb should play Boudica anyway… ”

Swooooon.

mostlysignssomeportents:

drvonlizak:

"To fight monsters… we created monsters of our own. We needed a new weapon… The Kätzchen Program was born."

This is literally the first cat picture I’ve ever felt the need to post on the Internet, ever.

This makes me so very, very happy.

therumpus:

Here’s today’s Daily GIF!

Well, this fixes everything.

therumpus:

Here’s today’s Daily GIF!

Well, this fixes everything.

a-golden-lasso-of-my-own:


Yay! Feminist Anthropology time!
Prehistoric Cave Prints Show Most Early Artists Were Women

Alongside drawings of bison and horses, the first painters left clues to their identity on the stone walls of caves, blowing red-brown paint through rough tubes and stenciling outlines of their palms. New analysis of ancient handprints in France and Spain suggests that most of those early artists were women.This is a surprise, since most archaeologists have assumed it was men who had been making the cave art. One interpretation is that early humans painted animals to influence the presence and fate of real animals that they’d find on their hunt, and it’s widely accepted that it was the men who found and killed dinner.But a new study indicates that the majority of handprints found near cave art were made by women, based on their overall size and relative lengths of their fingers."The assumption that most people made was it had something to do with hunting magic," Penn State archaeologist Dean Snow, who has been scrutinizing hand prints for a decade, told NBC News. The new work challenges the theory that it was mostly men, who hunted, that made those first creative marks. Another reason we thought it was men all along? Male archeologists from modern society where gender roles are rigid and well-defined — they found the art. "[M]ale archaeologists were doing the work," Snow said, and it’s possible that ”had something to do with it.”

I added the emphasis in bold, but the “that” was already italicized in the article, and it’s probably my favorite part. I love this article, although I’m not a huge fan of the fact that it’s considered so incredibly shocking and radical to imagine that women possibly participated in society 40,000 years ago.
In other awesome feminist anthropology news: it is now somewhat accepted that the venus sculptures, rather than being depictions of female beauty by male artists, were self-portraits by women looking down at their own bodies. The paleolithic figurines lose their distorted proportions and acquire representational realism if we understand that they are self-portraits created by women looking down at their own bodies. 
See also: This quote by Sandy Toksvig

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. ‘This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar’ she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book The Women’s History of the World (recently republished as Who Cooked the Last Supper?) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.



That moment when you look at a photo of a woman looking down at her own body, look down at your own body, and realize everything you think you know may be wrong. a-golden-lasso-of-my-own:


Yay! Feminist Anthropology time!
Prehistoric Cave Prints Show Most Early Artists Were Women

Alongside drawings of bison and horses, the first painters left clues to their identity on the stone walls of caves, blowing red-brown paint through rough tubes and stenciling outlines of their palms. New analysis of ancient handprints in France and Spain suggests that most of those early artists were women.This is a surprise, since most archaeologists have assumed it was men who had been making the cave art. One interpretation is that early humans painted animals to influence the presence and fate of real animals that they’d find on their hunt, and it’s widely accepted that it was the men who found and killed dinner.But a new study indicates that the majority of handprints found near cave art were made by women, based on their overall size and relative lengths of their fingers."The assumption that most people made was it had something to do with hunting magic," Penn State archaeologist Dean Snow, who has been scrutinizing hand prints for a decade, told NBC News. The new work challenges the theory that it was mostly men, who hunted, that made those first creative marks. Another reason we thought it was men all along? Male archeologists from modern society where gender roles are rigid and well-defined — they found the art. "[M]ale archaeologists were doing the work," Snow said, and it’s possible that ”had something to do with it.”

I added the emphasis in bold, but the “that” was already italicized in the article, and it’s probably my favorite part. I love this article, although I’m not a huge fan of the fact that it’s considered so incredibly shocking and radical to imagine that women possibly participated in society 40,000 years ago.
In other awesome feminist anthropology news: it is now somewhat accepted that the venus sculptures, rather than being depictions of female beauty by male artists, were self-portraits by women looking down at their own bodies. The paleolithic figurines lose their distorted proportions and acquire representational realism if we understand that they are self-portraits created by women looking down at their own bodies. 
See also: This quote by Sandy Toksvig

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. ‘This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar’ she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’
It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book The Women’s History of the World (recently republished as Who Cooked the Last Supper?) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.



That moment when you look at a photo of a woman looking down at her own body, look down at your own body, and realize everything you think you know may be wrong.

a-golden-lasso-of-my-own:

Yay! Feminist Anthropology time!

Prehistoric Cave Prints Show Most Early Artists Were Women

I added the emphasis in bold, but the “that” was already italicized in the article, and it’s probably my favorite part. I love this article, although I’m not a huge fan of the fact that it’s considered so incredibly shocking and radical to imagine that women possibly participated in society 40,000 years ago.

In other awesome feminist anthropology news: it is now somewhat accepted that the venus sculptures, rather than being depictions of female beauty by male artists, were self-portraits by women looking down at their own bodies. The paleolithic figurines lose their distorted proportions and acquire representational realism if we understand that they are self-portraits created by women looking down at their own bodies. 

See also: This quote by Sandy Toksvig

When I was a student at Cambridge I remember an anthropology professor holding up a picture of a bone with 28 incisions carved in it. ‘This is often considered to be man’s first attempt at a calendar’ she explained. She paused as we dutifully wrote this down. ‘My question to you is this – what man needs to mark 28 days? I would suggest to you that this is woman’s first attempt at a calendar.’

It was a moment that changed my life. In that second I stopped to question almost everything I had been taught about the past. How often had I overlooked women’s contributions? How often had I sped past them as I learned of male achievement and men’s place in the history books? Then I read Rosalind Miles’s book The Women’s History of the World (recently republished as Who Cooked the Last Supper?) and I knew I needed to look again. History is full of fabulous females who have been systematically ignored, forgotten or simply written out of the records. They’re not all saints, they’re not all geniuses, but they do deserve remembering.

That moment when you look at a photo of a woman looking down at her own body, look down at your own body, and realize everything you think you know may be wrong.

(via maryrobinette)

medievalpoc:

Spanning one-ninth of the earth’s circumference across three continents, the Roman Empire ruled a quarter of humanity through complex networks of political power, military domination and economic exchange. These extensive connections were sustained by premodern transportation and communication technologies that relied on energy generated by human and animal bodies, winds, and currents.

Conventional maps that represent this world as it appears from space signally fail to capture the severe environmental constraints that governed the flows of people, goods and information. Cost, rather than distance, is the principal determinant of connectivity.

For the first time, ORBIS allows us to express Roman communication costs in terms of both time and expense. By simulating movement along the principal routes of the Roman road network, the main navigable rivers, and hundreds of sea routes in the Mediterranean, Black Sea and coastal Atlantic, this interactive model reconstructs the duration and financial cost of travel in antiquity.

Taking account of seasonal variation and accommodating a wide range of modes and means of transport, ORBIS reveals the true shape of the Roman world and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history.

Not gonna lie, this is kind of amazing.

Basically, you can plan a trip from Rome to Alexandria, and get an estimate of journey time, expense of trip, the supplies you’ll need….let’s just say it’s better than Oregon Trail:

image

image

image

image

This is spectacular.

kategardiner:

This is an ice rink outside in front of indoor palm trees. In New York. #nyc (at Brookfield Place, Winter Garden)

I once ice-skated with palm trees in LA, but it was outdoors, and the ice was melting in the rain.

This looks better.

kategardiner:

The Denver Post is looking for a weed editor. Wonder if someone from the @hightimes is looking. #softball (via » Newspaper job posting of the day JIMROMENESKO.COM)

I hope they’re flexible about deadlines.

matociquala:

I’m Richard Feynman.

SCORE.

vixyish:

seananmcguire:

camwyn:

leeshajoy:

ravenalegria13:

xdaringdamselx:

patheticchampion:

squiglycontinello:

connorbabeway:

grimbarke:

Oh damnit I watched Escape Plan.

Nononononono

Im am asgardian warrior

well it certainly sounds intersting

:) i’m rorschach :)

iM A JAEGER PILOT

GHOSTBUSTER!

THE NORSE GOD OF THUNDER. FUCK YEAH!

…Dorothy Gale doesn’t actually have a job, unless you count how she becomes a princess in the Oz books.

Jaeger pilot. I tend to go a while between movies. I’mma need a Drift-mate, though.

Reporting for duty LET’S GO PUNCH THINGS.

President? Insane army general? British naval officer? Mad scientist? I’m not sure which one was the protagonist. Or I’m just Peter Sellers.

"He say you Blade Runner."